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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

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Andy HugIf you follow kickboxing you should know the name Andy Hug by now. If you aren't overly familiar with him or his body of work, you'll at least know the name from being tossed around by fans. There is a reason why the name Andy Hug lives on over ten years after his death; he was an incredible fighter who made a deep impression on every fan who has ever seen him fight.

HDnet's Michael Schiavello takes a look at Andy Hug's life and death in another great article on the HDnet website.

His third kickboxing fight was against Croatian legend Branko Cikatic at a time when Cikatic was at the height of his powers as K-1 world champion. In the end there was blood all over the canvas: Hug’s nose was broken and Cikatic’s face a bloodied mess. Hug’s hand was raised in victory and a new era in the sport was born.

Hug’s lack of boxing skills (full contact Karate competition does not permit punches to the head, so Karate exponents traditionally lack competent boxing skills) and ring savvy saw him dropped three times in the opening twenty seconds of his K-1 elimination fight against USA’s Patrick Smith in early 1994. Though Hug was never in serious trouble and jumped to his feet after each down, the referee stopped the fight on the three knockdown rule.

Hug swore revenge.

He enlisted the services of boxing trainer Uwe Ulman and on September 18 1994 claimed his revenge with a savage knee knockout to Smith’s head that stopped the American midway through the opening round.

Do yourself a favor if you don't know Andy Hug, read the rest of Schiavello's article, and go to YouTube and type in "Andy Hug." [source]

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If you were ever curious as to what a retired Dutch kickboxer does after he retires other than train the next crop of champions, look no further than what goes on in Japan. In Japan, being famous means a lot more than it does in other places, as long as you have the attention of the people, you are worth piles of money. Ask Bob Sapp about that.

Ernesto Hoost is known as "Mr. Perfect" and holds four K-1 World Grand Prix Championships, which is something the Japanese fans are not going to forget any time soon. Even though Hoost hasn't participated in K-1 for a few years now, he is still popular with the Japanese people, so enter this latest ad featuring Mr. Perfect. It is for Reebok's ZIGCAMP campaign and, well, the video speaks for itself.

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The -63kgs division in Japan is smoking hot right now, and since K-1 introduced the division last year and ran the K-1 -63kgs tournament, the eyes of the world have slowly turned towards Japan's -63kgs division. Of course, it has always been there, but sometimes it just takes people a while to come around to good things that are a bit hidden.

One of Japan's standouts, Koya Urabe, has been on a bit of a roll in the past year and a half, so enter KRUSH from January 9th, as Koya Urabe squares off with Son Hyun-Lee in the first round of KRUSH's -63kgs tournament. Basically, watch as Urabe and Lee beat the snot out of each other for nearly 15 minutes and be in awe. Check out redrum7171's YouTube channel for a bunch of awesome videos from K-1 and other kickboxing promotions in Japan.

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Nothing makes me laugh more than the term "train UFC." It has permeated into our popular culture and become a term of endearment for most fans. Most of us have known a guy who has gone to a gym and then boasts to his friends that he "trains UFC." Of course, that isn't the case with one of the top Featherweights in the world. Michihiro Omigawa. Omigawa is a case study in how a fighter dropping weight can go from mediocre to a world beater.

Omigawa's record since dropping to Featherweight is 8-2-1, with his first loss being the first time he cut against a now legendary fighter in the US, "The Korean Zombie" Jung Chan-Sung. The second loss was a close decision loss to Masanori Kanehara in the Sengoku Featherweight Grand Prix Finals. Omigawa's run in the Featherweight Grand Prix is now that of legend; a fighter who was down and out, who saw himself as a failure and goes into a tournament with a losing record as fodder for bigger stars emerges as the biggest star in the promotion. To this day, there has not been a fighter in Japan during this era who has went from nobody to big star like Omigawa.

I know certain Japanese MMA pundits will disagree with me, but in today's landscape in Japan everything is leftovers. Omigawa was becoming the first home-grown star since the days of PRIDE. Omigawa just went on a five-fight tear through SRC, ASTRA and DREAM where he demanded his title shot over and over again, when it didn't happen and UFC was set to begin promoting Featherweight bouts, it made perfect sense for Omigawa to accept an offer from UFC and head to the West yet again. Japan's loss is America's gain, as we get one of the most exciting, talented and emotionally charged Featherweights in the world fighting in the UFC yet again. Fighters like Omigawa would make me watch a UFC event.

Here is a video by Dan Herbertson of MMAFighting.com of Omigawa training for his return fight to UFC against Chad Mendes.

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IgnashovThis Saturday, February 5 in Slovakia is an event titled Ring of Honor with a featured bout between Alexey Ignashov and Roman Kleibl.

Kleibl is a good fighter who has picked up some solid wins in his career, including a 2009 tournament victory in K-1 ColliZion.  He's not yet been able to quite get over the hump and make an impact on the upper ranks, though he still has the chance to do just that.  Last year he competed at the K-1 East Europe GP.  I predicted he would do well there, but he was eliminated in the quarter final round by Mighty Mo.

As for Ignashov, what else is there to say at this point?  2010 was supposed to be the year of the comeback for The Red Scorpion, but instead he sat out most of the year before turning in a very underwhelming performance against Tomas Hron at It's Showtime to cap it off.  The common talking point about Ignashov is that he has all the tools to be top in the world but lacks motivation, although I'm not even sure that is true any more - he definitely had those tools at one point, but we have not seen them in ages.  A lot of fans still hold out hope for a return of the old Iggy; sadly, I just don't think that's going to happen.

This is the 2nd meeting between these two as they fought in May 2009 for K-1 ColliZion.  Kleibl took the decision win there, and I see no reason not to predict the same outcome here.

The rest of the card is a mix of K-1 rules, Muay Thai, and MMA with a few name fighters in there.  Here is the complete line-up, from The Science of 8 Limbs:

Muay Thai Rules: Abdoul Toure (France) vs Vladimir Moracvick (Slovakia) 75 kg

K-1 Rules:  Vladimir Konsky (Eastern Beasts) vs Mark Wildeboar (Netherlands)

K-1 Rules: Alexei Ignashov vs Roman Kleibl

K-1 Rules: Tomas Kohout vs Vitalij Akhramenko

MMA Rules: Atilla Vegh vs Hans Stringer

K-1 Rules: Erik Kosztanko /MTC BA/ vs James Asamoah /Holandsko/

K-1 Rules: Tomáš Šenkýr /Ares ZA/ vs Tomas Pakutinskaso /Litva/

K-1 Rules: Rudolf Durica /SVK/ vs Chyngiz Alazov /Azerbajdzan/

K-1 Rules: Lukáš Body /Kickbox Poprad/ vs. Fadi Merza /Rakúsko/

MMA Rules: Matúš Mečár /SVK/ vs Rudolf Kríž /ČR/

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Last week: What did you think of former K-1 fighter Pat Barry's performance against Joey Beltran at UFC Fight for the Troops?

74% - Underwhelming

15% - Impressive

11% - Didn't see it

This week: K-1 MAX champion Giorgio Petrosyan is on an amazing 4 year, 30 fight undefeated streak that includes names like Souwer, Kraus, Zambidis, Sato, Buakaw.  This weekend, he scored another big win, this time over Sudsakorn.  He seems unstoppable, but at some point, he has to lose, right?

Who do you think will finally end Giorgio Petrosyan's undefeated streak?

Vote now on our main page and share your thoughts below in our comments.

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