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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Video

Andre "Dida" Amade is a MMA fighter who has been on a bit of a losing streak of late, but found a bit of a niche for himself in K-1's MAX division. After scoring a knockown against renowned Thai fighter Buakaw Por. Pramuk, Dida has been in demand for K-1 MAX events due to his exciting fighting style and immense power he packs. This documentary was done for The Fight Network and was Produced, edited and written by Jorge Barbosa and documents Dida moving to Canada to work with his brother and prepare to fight in K-1 MAX again. [Source]

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With It's Showtime's final show completed, the 2010 kickboxing season is pretty much complete.  Outside of a few fights at Dynamite!! and SRC, we've now seen what the year has to offer for action.  So what better time to look back at the best fights of the year?  Here's our first nominee - check back all week for more.

#1 - Tyrone Spong v. Jerome Le Banner (K-1 Yokohama, April 3)

At the time, this looked like it might have been the start of a career resurgence for JLB.  Coming in off his career low at the 2009 GP, Le Banner changed up his training, recommitted himself, and ended up going toe to toe with one of the new generation's rising stars, showing that there still is some fight left in the Hyper Battle Cyborg.  Le Banner's year will sadly be more defined by his temper tantrum walk-out against Kyotaro, but this fight was a real highlight, and easily his best showing in recent years.

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If you for some reason missed It's Showtime 45, you missed out on Mosab Amrani vs. Mohamed Khamal, an absolute, all-out war that not only went three rounds, but into an extension round before Khamal was able to pull himself together enough to pull off the big upset decision win.

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This was a quarter-final match-up in the 2010 S-Cup.

Andy Souwer is a two time S-Cup champion and was a heavy favorite to win the fight and progress to the finals. He typically fights a cerebral, point-scoring game that increases in pace as the rounds go on. This is in stark contrast to the damage-absorbing, Terminator style of his opponent.

Bovy Sor Udomson is a legend of Muay Thai with a reputation for being somewhat inhuman in the ring. His uncompromisingly aggressive style won him the Rajadamnern belt at the young age of 19, but his career peaked quickly because of the damage he took. He's moved up slowly in weight from 122 lb super bantamweight to continue fighting at 67-70 kg, 147-154 lb, though with obviously dimmed reflexes.

Bovy wears blue gloves here and Andy the red.

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This is my second post on clinch rules in K-1 and how they've changed. Post I featured Buakaw Por Pramuk's utter destruction of Takayuki Kohiruimaki via clinch knees.

In 2005, K-1 made its first major change to its clinch fighting rules. Fighters could now only throw one knee per clinch. Pre-2005, extended clinching with knees had been allowed, in the fashion of Muay Thai. People speculated as to why K-1 made this change, most citing Schilt's dominance with knees in the WGP, others citing the clinch skills of a fighter newly arrived in MAX, Buakaw Por Pramuk. No one really knows and, to my knowledge, K-1's explanation that it made fights more exciting was not readily taken up by the K-1 community.

This is from the 2006 K-1 MAX Final 16. Notice how Buakaw, very aggressive in the clinch against Kohi, now limits himself to one knee in the clinch, in accordance with the rule change in 2005. Until 2006, referees seemed unsure as to how to enforce the rule, but by this point they were quicker in breaking clinches and warning fighters, as they do in the third.

Virgil Kalakoda, a South African boxer, turned to K-1 in 2005. He was slow to add weapons to his repertoire and, facing Buakaw the year after his debut, he employs mostly hands in a bullying, smothering style.

Watch Virgil's attempts to shut down Buakaw's traditional kicking game and how Buakaw responds to Virgil's strategy. Virgil actually has a large weight advantage over Buakaw, being as he moved down from 78 kg, 170 lb, in boxing to fight K-1 at 70 kg, while Buakaw moved from 63.5 kg, 140 lb, to fight in the MAX. The mass likely makes his tactics more effective. Buakaw wears the red gloves in this bout, Virgil the blue.

Part 1

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