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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Earlier today at Korakuen Hall in Tokyo, former K-1 Heavyweight champion Kyotaro Fujimoto stepped into the ring for his 7th pro boxing bout against another former kickboxer in Fabrice Aurieng. After making the switch to boxing in late 2011, Kyotaro started his career with 5 straight wins including 3 knockouts before challenging Austrailia's Solomon Haumono for the OBPF Heavyweight title this past New Year's Eve. That fight didn't end so well for Kyotaro, who was rocked early in the 5th round, then, while seemingly out on his feet, put away for good with a monstrous right hand. Today, it was Kyotaro handing out the punishment as he knocked Aurieng down four times over the course of 7 rounds before forcing a corner stoppage at 1:11 in the 7th. He came in with an aggressive style and his defense still seems to be a bit shaky, but it was another good showing from the former K-1 champ against a fighter with a lot of fight experience, although Aurieng's boxing experience is about the same as Kyotaro's. Clearly, he has a long way to go before challenging some of boxing's top heavyweights and his management would probably be smart to put him in with some of the less powerful punchers in the division to get him some rounds and help him improve his defense. However, Kyotaro has shown good power, improved footwork and a solid chin on top of his kickboxing experience, so there's no reason that, with some polishing and a couple more years, he can't be a viable contender in a depleted Heavyweight landscape.


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