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An argument for why now is the best time ever to be a kickboxing fan

As usual, I began my weekly prep of the Warman Kickfighting podcast show by writing out my notes. I watched the Thai stadium muay thai fights for critical breakdown. Then I rewatched fights from the Glory 28 participants before this weekends event. As I watched them, I realize that I had just done this for a Glory card two weeks ago. Then it hit me that there seems to be multiple major cards every week. From Enfusion having their most successful card, to Lion Fight having another stoppage filled event, every weekend has been full of fights. In the next two months we have Yokkao, Bellator's kickboxing league, Holland's World Fighting League, and another Glory card. I have been a kickboxing fan for a long time. I cannot remember a better time to be a kickboxing fan, and yet we may be held back from enjoying it by our oldest fan base.

BLESSED AND CURSED BY OUR HISTORY

In the 90s, when K-1 emerged muay thai and kickboxing didn't just have several events. They dominated the martial arts sporting combat culture. UFC at that time was considered street fighting. The term mixed martial artist was not in use. A skilled martial artist tested themselves in kickboxing or muay thai. They had the K-1 World Grand Prix, which put the value of state and country driven world titles and put the athletes to the test in a tournament field of the best. Names like Aerts, Hoost, Bernardo, Hug, and Lebanner emerge as consistent victors and major international stars. But just as important as the star, the major K-1 tournament produced a holy place. Everyone wanted to one day fight in Japan, where there was borderline idol worship of elite combatants. 

Along with this came the advancement of technology. Computers went from novelty to mandatory in homes across the world. With this brought the emergence of fight forums, where people from all around the world would weigh in on the events of their region, stars to look out for, and of course, long breakdowns of the major K-1 fight cards. European based Super League got some attention, but clearly, the leagues of note were K-1’s Heavyweight and 70kg Max divisions. 

Flash Forward to 2011. K-1, due to multiple reasons, ran into financial trouble. They began to do less and less shows and eventually had to cancel their World Cup. They had no K-1 WGP that year. Interests down, the emergence of mixed martial arts and the UFC as the new leader in the culture of combat sports, and many proclaimed the end of kickboxing. 

THE TURN

Then, the Glory group attempted to buy K-1. They decided against it after seeing the mess of contracts and debt they would be absorbing. But, rich people play the game of business best, and they were able to purchase Simon Rutz's It’s Showtime management team. Rutz had almost every major European K-1 star under his roster and they were pulled from K-1 and began fighting in Glory on a regular basis. 

K-1 was also hit with a fantastic turn for the best. The K-1 Global Holdings Ltd. attempted to recreate the old flame of K-1s greatness. A failed attempt of an event in USA and a K-1 World Grand Prix that did not have the best fighters in the world ruined the brand more than helped it. The group that took over at the end of the K-1 Global run decided to focus on smaller weights and remain in the Asian Market of which they had great history. 

In the last two years both companies have overcome rocky starts and have begun to have consistent success. Glory had the early mistake. A failed PPV event and the longest fight card ever on NYE did not push the brand. However, they signed major US television deals with Spike and now ESPN, something K-1 never accomplished. Just as important as being seen is creating stars. Nieky Holzken and Rico Verhoeven are Glory brand created stars. Sure a young Holzken fought in K-1 and lost to superstar Buakaw. That drained down version wasn't his best showing, though. Holzken, now fighting at 77kgs, is considered the must see guy in the sport. His combinations, body shots, knockout power, and fight flow are amazing. Verhoeven went from journeyman heavyweight with no punching pop, to the unchallenged best in the world and the KO power to match his awesome technique. 

Improved K-1 too had some failure. A K-1 Max GP that ended in scandal as one of the fighters(Two time champ Buakaw) said that he was warned of foul play in the judges and refused to fight the extra round of a K-1 MAX FINAL MATCH. Since then they have focused on weight classes that have elite Japanese athletes. K-1 had their most success with Masato, a young, exciting fighter who the girls loved and had the skill to beat the elite. As many of Japan's elite combat sport athletes are shorter, focusing on weight classes like 65kgs, 60kgs, and now 55kgs has produced several athletes from Japan that create Japanese television interests. Masaaki Noiri, brothers Koya and Hirotaka Urabe, Japanese adopted Kimura "Phillip" Minoru and 55kg stud Takeru are their homegrown stars. K-1 puts on five solid shows a year and though they don't have the production value of events past, the crowd and ring action are excellent every card. 

With the success of these two super powers, we have solid paychecks from China. Kunlun is hard to follow because it has a lot of fights, but not a lot of narrative. However they have put together some fantastic 4 man tournaments and super fights on their cards. Kunlun is also not exclusive, meaning that K-1 and Glory athletes are able to pick up a fight here and there and grab good paydays, as long as it doesn't conflict with their major promotions events. 

As for women, this is also the best time to be in the sport. When I first fell in love with kickboxing and Muay Thai it was a three woman list at most. Names like Rijker, De Randamie, Kitchen, Rivera-Parr, and Elmont were amazing competitors, but got very little recognition. Thanks to Enfusion, Kunlun and now Bellator's kickboxing league. There aren't just good paydays out there. There are great exposure opportunities as well. Iman Barlow was the first woman pushed by Enfusion and after a reality show victory, they began pushing Anissa Meksen as well. Denise Keilholtz is an Enfusion champion who will now be fighting for Bellator's kickboxing company as well. Lion Fight was birthed on champions like American Tiffany van Soest. We are truly in a different age. Despite this, older fans are still missing the above improvements and continuing to think kickboxing remains in a down period.

CHANGING MINDS

The struggle with noticing the improvement is the old guard of kickboxing fans that misunderstood success in the kickboxing prime of 1994-2003. They judge today's athletes with old expectations. They recognize kickboxing as K-1, the way people recognize MMA as UFC. With no heavyweights winning tournaments in Japan once a year, they assume the sport is down.

They also struggled to grasp the movement of technology. I think a major reason why older fans feel the sport is dead is because it lived on fight forums. As "Lord Gaul" I was a 1000+ post man on several sites. We would talk about every punch in every fight for months before and after. With that being absent, people see the sport as dead. 

What those fans have missed in these two examples is that K-1 was only good for the heavyweights and Max weight guys. Dimitri Shukuta and Joeri Mes were the elite 77kg fighters of their era. But they had no home. The moment Super League went away they were forced to look for single fights. Mes at the end of his career was able to lean down and take a few K-1 fights. But for the majority of those in-between the weight classes, this was a loss. Guys like Kamel Jamel, Anuwat, Liam Harrison were too small, and guys like Clifton Brown and Nathan Corbett were stuck in the middle. Imagine if they had a middleweight K-1 belt to battle for. Tyrone Spong moving up the weight classes would have gotten even more attention if he won the K-1 belt at every single weight on his way up to heavyweight. We are in a special time when the most prominent company has a home for the majority of the world's weight classes.

The technology evolved for the best. YouTube was pretty new when I got into kickboxing and it was actually looked down upon in kickboxing communities. People wanted links to download for their hard drives. Sendspace and Megaupload where the acceptable modes of sharing and those that didn't share were called "leechers." We are 10plus years past that now. YouTube is the heavyweight champ in the video world. Not only can you find most videos there, but the major promotions upload content for you to watch, as advertising money can be made with viewership. So of course the number of visitors to the fight forums would go down once access to the videos got easier. Twitter is another addition. We use to post and then press reload to see other peoples post. It is far easier posting on the ever scrolling wall of twitter. You can now watch a stream of the event on your computer and tweet on your phone...or vice versa. 

Now I am not saying this changes cover everything we had in the prime years. I personally dreamed of the Japanese crowd when I pursued a kickboxing career. The K-1 tournament was indeed a special event exclusive to kickboxing, with its awesome white belt and massive trophy prize. Also all the cultural challenged aren't gone. Now stand up fighters see kickboxing and Muay Thai as something they do in preparation for MMA careers. However I can't help but be excited for the next generation of kickboxers. Enfusion and Glory do ten plus shows a year. K-1 and Yokkao do five plus, and Kunlun does fifteen plus. There are more opportunities to fight in front of large audiences, have access to more television and online stream exposure, make better paydays, and they can pursue kickboxing combat sports careers with more opportunities to compete than ever before. 

 

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ESPN3 Airing GLORY 28 Live at 4pm Eastern on Saturday

This Saturday in Paris, France we'll see one of GLORY's best cards to date with GLORY 28. GLORY 28 will be airing live on ESPN3 at 4pm Eastern on Saturday (remember, ESPN3 is their web platform) and will be replayed Sunday night at 9pm Eastern on ESPN2. That means that the GLORY SuperFight Series card will be airing live on UFC Fight Pass at 1:30pm Eastern time.

GLORY 28 Paris (Live on ESPN3 at 4 p.m. ET)

Heavyweight Title Headline Bout: Rico Verhoeven (c) vs. Mladen Brestovac

Lightweight Tournament Final Bout: Winner of Bout A vs. Winner of Bout B

Welterweight Co-Headline Bout: Murthel Groenhart vs. Cédric Doumbé

Lightweight Tournament Semi-Final Bout B: Marat Grigorian vs. Djimé

Lightweight Tournament Semi-Final Bout A: Sittichai vs. Davit Kiria

GLORY SuperFight Series Paris (Live on UFC FIGHT PASS at 1 p.m. ET)

Light Heavyweight Title Headline Bout: Saulo Cavalari (c) vs. Artem Vakhitov

Heavyweight Co-Headline Bout: Freddy Kemayo vs. Xavier Vigney

Featherweight Title Bout: Serhiy Adamchuk (c) vs. Mosab Amrani

Middleweight Bout: Jason Wilnis vs. Filip Verlinden

Lightweight Bout: Josh Jauncey vs. Johan Tkac

Featherweight Bout: Maykol Yurk vs. Eddy Naït-Slimani

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Updated Card for Bellator Kickboxing's Debut Show in Torino, Italy

On April 16 in Torino, Italy Bellator Kickboxing will finally make its debut. The card, set to be headlined by Melvin Manhoef, is starting to come together with a few interesting bouts. Melvin Manhoef finally has an opponent in Alexandru Negrea and Mustapha Haida will fight Karim Ghajji in a very, very interesting battle between a battle-hardened veteran and a fighter that many see with a bright future in Haida. Raymond Daniels, Denise Kielholtz and Kevin Ross are still scheduled without opponents.

Updated “Bellator Kickboxing: Torino” Fight Card:

Bellator Kickboxing Middleweight Main Event: Melvin Manhoef (49-12) vs. Alexandru Negrea (8-2)

Bellator Kickboxing 165-Pound Feature Bout: Mustapha Haida (37-3-3) vs. Karim Ghajji (95-12)

Bellator Kickboxing Welterweight Feature Bout: Raymond Daniels (10-3) vs. TBA

Bellator Kickboxing Flyweight Feature Bout: Denise Kieholtz (43-2) vs. TBA

Bellator Kickboxing Bantamweight Feature Bout: Kevin Ross (30-9) vs. TBA

Update: Here is the full card for the kickboxing portion of the event, including the Venum Victory World Series portion of the card.

Card 

H 17:30 VICTORY WORLD SERIES. 

Technical partner Leone Sport.

ThaiBoxe code Fight Rules, 3 rounds x 3 min + extra rounds in case of a tie.

Cat - 60 kg Tarik Totts (Mar) vs. Wang Shanwei (Chn)

Cat -95 kg Igor Bougaienko (BR) vs. Bruno Sousano (Portugal)

Cat -70 kg Armen Petrosyan (ITA) vs Wang Tengyue Chn)

Cat -72.5 kg Chingis Allazov (Az) vs Wu Sihan (Chn)

Cat -70kg Giorgio Petrosyan (TA) vs Jordan Watson (UK)

H 20:00 Bellator KICKBOXING. 

Technical partner Boxeur des rues.

3 x 3 min rounds + extra round for a draw

Cat -57 kg Denise Kielholz (NL) vs tba (ITA)

Cat -65 kg Taccini Matteo (ITA) vs Kevin Ross (USA)

Cat -77 kg Moricca Francesco (ITA) vs Raymond Daniels (USA)

Cat - 75.5 kg world title ISKA 5 rounds of 3 minutes 

karim Gajii (F) champion vs Mustapha Haida (Sea) Challenger 

Cat -86 kg Melvin Manhoef (NL) vs Alexandru Negrea (ROM)

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Muaythai Mania 10 in Hungary on March 12

On March 12 Muaythai Mania will open its doors again for the 10th time.

As fans can see on the events FB page it's not a secret that this time, for its jubilee the theme for MTM refers to the legendary soccer game from 1953 where the Hungarian team managed to grab a fantastic 6:3 win against England hoping that Hungarian fighters entering the ring on the night of the show will provide something similar.

Péter Albrecht, Norbert Spéth, Dominik Bereczki, Róbert Radics and Márk Hegedűs will seek to repeat history a bit and surprise the world at the Sport Hall of Mosonszolnok.

Fight card

63.5 kg Albrecht Péter vs Kris Pearson
67 kg Radics Róbert vs TBA
67 kg Spéth Norbert vs Alex Bublea
72.6kg Bereczki Dominik vs Giannis Skordilis
76 kg Hegedűs Márk vs Danny Edwards

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