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Badr Hari Publicly Announces Social Media Explanation

Badr Hari has finally made a video to publicly explain to everyone what has been going on with his social media accounts. I'm not sure how these fake accounts got verified without his consent but I can't help but feel there is more to the story. Anyway he has had all these fake accounts closed down and opened his own REAL accounts which he says he will have a team running for him. I wonder how long it will take for this team to do something he doesn't like and then these will become fake accounts as well, hopefully that doesn't happen, but only time will tell. His accounts have been quite active with videos and pictures, so if you're a Badr fan here is his FacebookTwitter, and Website which is coming soon.

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Liverkick Throwback: Branko Cikatic Vs Ernesto Hoost II

The world of kickboxing has a rich history to fall back upon so we here at LiverKick figure, why not? Why not give a glimpse into some of the fights from the past that have made up this wonderful sport and tie it all in to the present. The kids on the Instagram and Twitter like to call Thursdays "Throwback Thursdays," I'm just going to say that this is a LiverKick Throwback.

Branco Cikatic was the original Croatian heavyweight Kickboxer and the first Croation born fighter to achieve international success. K-1 didn't start until 1993, Branko was 38 years old already, but he made the most of it and became the very first K-1 grand prix champion and won all three fights in one night by knockout. Cikatic had a rock-solid chin and huge power in both hands, he wasn't the most technical fighter but he was more of a take a punch to land my harder punch type. Branco tried a few MMA fights after winning K-1 and jumped in the Pride ring, now Cikatic was never the cleanest of fighters and that ended up causing most of his Pride fights to end in DQ or No contest.

This fight with the legend Ernesto Hoost was for the K-1 grand prix 1993 Finals in Tokyo, Japan. Hoost was 10 years younger than Cikatic and had already beat Peter Aerts and Maurice Smith in the quarter and semi finals. I feel Hoost was easily winning this fight up until Branko did what he does best and landed a huge right on poor Ernesto's chin and cause a heavy KO.

 

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SuperKombat Announces World Grand Prix Final Elimination on October 25th

This weekend SuperKombat will promote the SuperKombat World Grand Prix in Almere, Netherlands, featuring Catalin Morosanu vs. Brian Douwes, plus a four-man tournament. They plan on staying ahead of the curve, though, announcing the SuperKombat World Grand Prix Final Elimination event for October 25th in Geneva, Switzerland. The show will feature four elimination bouts between top Light Heavyweights, which will seed them for the November 22nd SuperKombat World Grand Prix Final tournament in Italy.

The main event of the evening will be SuperKombat Super Cruiserweight Champion Andrei Stoica vs. Moises Baute of Spain. This will be Andrei's second title defense and Moises Baute's time to shine after winning the tournament in Constanta earlier this year. For more information on the event, check out SuperKombat.com.

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The Wonderful World of Kickboxing

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As those of us who’ve been around for a while might say, when it comes to the sport of kickboxing, no news is typically bad news. We’ve been hearing a lot of rumors about Glory in the past few months--from murky accounts of an organization on dire straits to assurances by some of our professional kickboxing journalist pals that they have the exclusive scoop on BIG NEWS which has simply been embargoed by Glory for the time being. The fact remains that we haven’t heard anything substantive from Glory since July. There was talk of more SpikeTV content and of an event to be held at the end of October--we’re still waiting for any of these things to materialize. This behavior is worrisome for those of us who followed the scene as recently as 2012, when K-1 made promise after promise of a big comeback that ultimately never took place. It would be sad to see Glory succumb to the same fate as its ambitious predecessors, with K-1 and It’s Showtime telling the tale of how unforgiving the fight business can be.

Kickboxing in particular is a very strange industry, one that appears very active at a glance but which tells a far more sobering story beneath the surface. If we judged the scene solely on the number of events held annually, we might think that things look pretty good, with organizations like LEGEND, Global FC, Top King, A-1, and SuperKombat making news on sites like this one with fight cards featuring big name talent. While the accessibility of this content is highly variable, from robust TV broadcasts to mislabeled camera phone footage posted on YouTube, there are nevertheless fights happening all over the world and subsequently news and results which we can report to you.

But the difference between offering you a survey of sundry action from around the globe and a developing narrative that you can follow and become engrossed in is the difference between Kickboxing as a mere curiosity and as a sport in its own right. There are plenty of Kickboxing and Muay Thai videos that show up on MMA sites, but as much as their readers might appreciate them, they will never get the same first person experience of being there when iconic and spectacular moments unfold--memories of being glued to your TV when Andy Hug landed that spinning back kick or when Joe Schilling knocked Simon Marcus out cold. These moments were real, and they made us believe in this sport and dream about the possibilities. Call it a pet peeve, but I find it a little heartbreaking when brilliant retrospectives of great kickboxing moments wind up on MMA sites under “look at what this might teach us about MMA technique!” headings.

No one in particular is to blame for how things have turned out for kickboxing. Ultimately the success of any venture depends on the convergence of talent, a solid product, proper promotion, and a receptive market at an opportune moment in time. Kickboxing had various combinations of these things at different points in time, but the times and circumstances changed. The downfall of K-1 had as much to do with its management as it did with evolving trends in the Japanese entertainment market. Many factors came into play, but unfortunately, things ended for K-1 in an ugly way, leaving fighters with substantial outstanding earnings which they may never be able to fully collect. However, let us not kid ourselves about what it takes to build a real professional sport league. We’ve seen plenty of flamboyant millionaire playboys from around the world blow their money to party with celebrities and to book their favorite kickboxers for an evening of entertainment. Some of these mysterious rich dudes will even slap a label on their “organization” and take lots of photos with kickboxing bigwigs to make things look legit, but we all know that trying to produce a sustainable sports entertainment venue for the masses takes a lot more vision and tenacity than that. No matter how flashy their shows get, the playboys are not going to save Kickboxing, and neither will the small promotions like Top King (although we’ll give it a chance, just like we always do--that’s the story of Kickboxing, right?) that seem to come and go every year.

We really hope that Glory will actually make it. It seems like the formula’s been there--Glory had enough money, the right talent, the right TV deal, and an ostensible understanding of the business startup process (God knows there are enough smart-sounding former hedge fund/venture capital people on board--how many of them does it take to screw in a light bulb?). Where do things stand now? We really don’t know. We do know that there have been no shows in three months, and if it is indeed true that Glory is coming to Oklahoma on November 7, then that will make four months since its last show. We really hope that the lights will stay on at Glory because as kickboxing fans, we’ve looked forward for a long time to not living in the dark of the sports world. 

 

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