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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

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August 28th will mark the second It's Showtime Japan event, this time a co-promotion with the Fujiwara Festival. However, its biggest impact on the kickboxing world will be Hisanori Maeda's retirement ceremony. Maeda was the 20th AJKF Featherweight Champion and has faced nearly every notable name at 60-63kg in Japan. During his time in AJKF, he faced Naoki Ishikawa, Masahiro Yamamoto, Genki Yamamoto, Hiromasa Masuda, Haruaki Otsuki, Kanongsuk and Ryuji Kajiwara. Though he was unsuccessful against many of them, he managed to go 2-1-1 against Naoki Ishikawa, with their final encounter being a draw for the AJKF Super Featherweight Championship at the last AJKF show.

After AJKF disbanded, he entered the 2009 Krush Lightweight tournament, defeating Fire Harada by knockout in the opening round of the tournament, but losing to Genki Yamamoto in the quarterfinals. He went on to defeat Daisuke Uematsu in a super fight at the finals of the Krush tournament. However, he finished out his career going 1-4 in 2010, losing to TURBΦ and Rashata in that stretch.

Maeda is just one of the many AJKF fighters who has struggled to find success in the post-AJKF Japanese scene and his retirement signifies another step in this changing of the guard in the Japanese scene which has seen many K-1 Koshien fighters find success in both K-1 and Krush. AJKF fighters may have a resurgence in the near future, but Hisanori Maeda will not be one of them.

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I wanted to write this article after seeing the scorecards for the Saenchai vs Kevin Ross fight and also in light of the scoring on the Cosmo Alexandre vs Cyrus Washington fight which was held in the US earlier this year.

Before I get started I should make it clear that I am not a qualified judge. For a definitive guide to how a Muay Thai fight should be scored you should check out this article by Tony Myers:

Judging a Muay Thai fight part onepart two

This is only intended to be a quick and rough guide for those who (like the judges in the US...) don't understand how a Muay Thai fight should be scored.

Muay Thai is not scored in the same way as boxing, K-1 or MMA so trying to apply the same criteria to a Muay Thai fight that you would any another combat sport is a waste of time.

The first two rounds of a Muay Thai fight are always scored a draw, unless one fighter absolutely dominates or visibly hurts his opponent. The opening rounds are only intended to be used as a feeling out process and good fighters will almost always treat them as such. Rounds one and two are an opportunity to size up your opponents and to begin to demonstrate your superiority to the judges BUT will generally have no effect on the scoring of the fight.

Rounds three, four and five are the decisive rounds and the result of them will settle the outcome of the fight unless there is a stoppage. Muay Thai rounds are not scored in isolation though so, for instance, if one fighter looked stronger in rounds one and two but round three is even the judges will often give round three to the fighter who looked stronger in the opening rounds.

A fighter who is already ahead normally seems to get the benefit of the doubt in a close round which means that once a fighter has taken a lead on the scorecards he only needs to be as good as his opponent to win the fight, whereas the opponent needs to clearly demonstrate that he is better. This may seem like merely a semantic difference but it is never the less an important one.

Another way that Muay Thai differs dramatically from other combat sports is in the way that different techniques are scored. Any strike which lands cleanly scores points but straight knees and kicks to the mid section seem to score more points than any other techniques.

Read more after the break...

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If you've been coming to LiverKick.com for a while, you know Jill's awesome highlight videos. Even if you haven't, watch this highlight and enjoy.

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IlungaIt's Showtime's 95kg MAX Champion will return to action in this October in Germany, taking place in a one-night, four-man tournament. He is coming off of a rather baffling title defense where the usually crisp and technical Ilunga looked frustrated and sloppy. Here's hoping that he goes back to his roots and fights in the style that he is better known for. Brent Ducharme at HKL has the story;

When he returns to action in October, Ilunga will be faced with some of the better competition he'd find in Germany. The Fight Night Mannheim 95 kg. tournament will also feature James Phillips, an American-German fighter who was, until recently, the only man to have beaten Romanian prospect Andrei Stoica. The field will be rounded out by strong Turkish veteran Bahadir Sari and the relatively unknown Michail Tutijerev.

The October event will also feature a four-man 75 kg. tournament. Competitors for that tournament are former amateur Muay Thai standout Alex Schmitt, the rangy Patrick Djanang, Daniel Kohler, and Tefvik Sucu (semifinalist in the Klash tournament won by Faldir Chahbari last November). [source]
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Battle in the Desert 3Lion Fights, an upstart promotion based out of southern Nevada has featured some solid muay thai cards within the course of the last year. They are set to put on their third event in the series of "Battle in the Desert" this Saturday. Lion Fights released a statement today that they are working with Go Fight Live (GFL.tv) this upcoming Saturday to stream the event live for $14.99. This is a step in the right direction for Lion Fights, as I've been saying for a while that these upstart muay thai and kickboxing promotions in the United States need to work hard for exposure. Lion Fights is run by Scott Kent who has taken some of this advice and hired an actual PR firm to help with promoting the company and will stream the next event. These events have been well-received by those in attendance for past events, including UFC President Dana White.

The cost of 15 dollars might be a bit steep for a first event to be streamed, but a main event like Cosmo Alexandre vs. Sakmongkol Sitchuchoke could make you think twice about that. Full Press Release after the break.

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Earlier today, Krush held Krush 11 at Korakuen Hall in what is their first of hopefully many ISKA integrated events. Back in July, Krush announced two ISKA Championship bouts with two ISKA fighters and two Krush fighters facing off for the ISKA Bantamweight(55kg) and Super Lightweight(63kg) World Championships.

The main event of the night was the ISKA Bantamweight Championship bout between RISE Bantamweight Champion Nobuchika Terado and ISKA UK Bantamweight Champion Kieran McAskill in a fight that saw Tearado down McAskill four times with leg kicks throughout the course of the fight, earning Terado a wide decision win on scores of 50-41 and 50-40(x2). Terado was defeated in the first round of the Krush 55kg Tournament by Ryuya Kusakabe in a highly entertaining fight and this fight puts him back on a 2-fight win streak after a first round knockout win back at the May Krush event. A rematch with Krush 55kg Champion Shota Takiya would be a nice first title defense for Takiya.

In the co-feature, the flashy Keiji Ozaki lost a decision to France's Thomas Adamandopoulos on scores of 49-47 and 48-47(x2), landing Adamandopoulos the ISKA Super Lightweight World Title. It appears that Adamandopoulos scored a down in the 2nd round and it seems as though that was the deciding factor of the bout. The fight puts Ozaki at 1-2 on the year, but expect him to fight at another Krush event in the future, as his exciting, flashy style is one that fans and the Krush organization like.

In a super fight, Krush 55kg Tournament Champion Shota Takiya scored a first round knockout over KO-ICHI, extending his win streak to six, with his last loss being a decision loss to Ryuya Kusakabe in March of 2010, a loss he avenged by knockout in the Krush 55kg Tournament finals. As I said before, a title defense against Terado could be a possible next bout for him, though a rubber match with Kusakabe would likely generate more interest. Either fight should deliver in the entertainment department.

Krush and K-1 63kg Tournament runner up Koya Urabe returned to Krush, taking a unanimous decision over 2nd ranked NJKF Super Lightweight Marimo on scores of 28-27, 30-27 and 30-26. Urabe scored a 2nd round knockdown that led him to victory. Up next for Urabe could be the Krush Supernova tournament in October if he is a participant and hopefully the K-1 MAX -63kg World Tournament.

In a 60kg bout, TURBΦ and Junpei Aotsu faced off and went to an extension round after a 3rd round unanimous draw(30-30 x3). In the extension round, TURBΦ managed to take a split decision. Aotsu fought in the Krush 60kg tournament, but lost in the quarterfinals to Masaaki Noiri while TURBΦ was initially announced as a participant, but was replaced by Dynamite Yuta. Both have been struggling as of late, going a combined 1-7 over the past year. The fight snaps a 3-fight losing streak for TURBΦ and puts Aotsu back on a losing streak.

Finally, Team Dragon fighters Masakazu Watanabe and Namito Izawa both managed to pick up extension round decision wins.

The next Krush event is Krush 12 and scheduled for an already packed weekend on September 24th that already has the It's Showtime Fast and Furious Tournament, the K-1 MAX 70kg Japan Tournament, Dream.17, UFC 135 and Shootor's Legacy 4. The event will be another Team Dragon-heavy event as Krush 63kg Champion Ryuji Kajiwara, Krush 60kg Champion Hirotaka Urabe, Hideaki Yamazaki and Takumi are all set to participate.

Bout results via Boutreview

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