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Yokkao 5 Event Moved to Nov. 15th in Pattaya

  • Published in Muay Thai

Yokkao

For those that were eagerly awaiting the Yokkao 5 event in Reunion, France it looks like the wait will be just about a week longer and instead of taking place in Reunion it'll be moved to Pattaya, Thailand. The card remains the same, though, even with this kind of late notice, which is good. The Yokkao Team feels that they'll be able to put on a better show without problems in Thailand, which seems to be the best for the fighters right now.

Here is their official statement.

Due to several problems in Reunion Island with Maximin Lafuteur president of Associationne Culturelle Muay Thai, we decided to move #Yokkao5 event in Pattaya (Thailand) on 15th November 2013 (Pattaya World Boxing Stadium). The tickets bought at www.monticket.re will be refunded. Out of respect for fighters and in knowing what it means to train for a fight, all fighters contacted by our promoter Stefania Picelli will be remain on the fight card. Stay tuned for a spectacular event feat. Saenchai, Imwiset Pornnarai, Ekapop Sor Klinmee, Silvia La Notte, Andrea Masini and many others..

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First Chapter of the New Badr Hari Documentary Released

  • Published in Kickboxing

So our bud StillWill has made his return to the world of kickboxing videos and done so in not only a big way, but a huge way by working with Badr Hari and his team to bring to the world a documentary called "The Golden Boy" which will center around Badr Hari's life and career. The whole thing is due to be released soon but for now the first episode has been released and it's well worth the watch.

Check it out.

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Watch Mosab Amrani Train at Superpro Samui in Thailand

  • Published in Kickboxing

Mosab "The Jaguar" Amrani is one of the breakout stars in the European kickboxing world after a few great bouts for It's Showtime, including a Fight of the Year Contender against Mootje Khamal at It's Showtime: The Sand in December. He has another fight for It's Showtime coming up on May 14th at It's Showtime Lyon against Houcine Bennoui. So where has he been training for this bout? At Superpro Samui in Thailand, one of the better-known, quality Thai Boxing camps, best known for Pajonsuk Superpro Samui. Many feel that Amrani is one of the fighters to watch over the coming years, so watch Amrani training and follow his path to becoming one of the best.

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Glory 17: Glory Prepares to Distinguish Itself As a Combat Sports Brand

  • Published in News

Glory 17 is a turning point for Glory in many ways, marking its entry into the American PPV market by staging the largest, most significant kickboxing tournament on American soil in decades. But even more noteworthy than that, this event signifies the opportunity for Glory to truly distinguish itself as a unique combat sports product that is capable of delivering where other brands may falter, particularly the UFC. The UFC’s present difficulties are well known: problems with a ballooning roster, complaints about “boring” fights, and problems marketing fighters have led to great inconsistency in the quality of UFC events. Glory, on the other hand, has experienced few to no difficulties in this regard--and for very interesting reasons. In this article, I will talk about some of the things that I think make Glory a fairly unique entity in the combat sports world.

1. Each Glory weight class has more elite fighters than a single card can accommodate.

The Last Man Standing tournament is essentially a display of the entire Middleweight division, and it is a scary division, featuring Artem Levin, Joe Schilling, Simon Marcus, Wayne Barrett, Filip Verlinden, and Melvin Manhoef as well as dangerous contenders like Alex Pereira--all of these men are either champions, former champions, or fighters who have distinguished themselves against championship-level competition. Whereas some promotions might struggle to fill fight cards with less accomplished talent, Glory has the unique problem of struggling to fill fight cards with overqualified talent, bumping the likes of Levin to the non-televised SuperFight Series. If you ever find yourself wondering why a fighter like Giorgio Petrosyan gets to occupy the fourth slot on the Glory main card, it’s frequently because any Glory card could offer you a choice of several main event fights.

2. Glory has complete control of the rules of the sport.

No matter how many three or four-letter-name sanctioning bodies Glory will claim accountability to, the fact remains that Glory, as an organization in today’s combat sports market, is unique because of the complete control that it has on the rules of the sport. By frequently changing its clinch rules, its knockdown rules, and its 8-count rules, Glory has crafted and refined a viewing experience that is more fast-paced and exciting, producing a high volume of memorable fights and highlight reel moments. This is an ability that neither the UFC nor any other MMA organization possess, and the end result for them is a perpetual struggle to reconcile the Unified Rules of MMA with the type of fights that UFC wants to sell. Glory, by contrast, can eliminate any rule that negatively affects the viewing experience.

The flipside is that we also don’t have to talk about drug testing in the sport of Kickboxing. Glory is in a peculiar position here as well, operating between the lines of an oversight structure that is very dated and arguably unequipped to handle a multimillion dollar professional sport. Indeed, WKA’s official rules, published in 2011, leave drug testing up to the discretion of the “WKA supervisor, tournament promoters, and the official doctor,” who “can and may perform tests” but don’t necessarily have to do so unless directed by local law, making WKA’s actual responsibility very unclear. The procedure, standards, and logistics of testing are either mentioned in vague terms or not outlined at all. Glory, for its part, hasn’t forced the issue, leaving us to enjoy the fruits of ambiguity. In other words: don’t ask, don’t tell, and Pride never die.

3. Glory is learning how to market its fighters.

This is an issue that we’ve discussed several times here on LiverKick and which Dave Walsh expounded on in his excellent piece comparing kickboxing to the history of regional pro wrestling promotion. Behind every fight is an evolving narrative with at least two central characters, and as viewers, we’re interested in not only the fight itself but also in how the fight will determine the next chapter of the story. The promoter’s job is to build anticipation and interest in the fight and to illustrate what it means in the grand scheme of the division. With Glory 17, Glory has been proactive in producing media which tells us the story, including an excellent video on the rivalry between Rico Verhoeven and Daniel Ghita. The authenticity of this rivalry (for the critics’ sake) is as irrelevant as the authenticity of the 2009 rivalry between Badr Hari and Alistair Overeem--it felt real at the time and it electrified the atmosphere at the Saitama Super Arena. As Glory gains screen time on television and PPV, promotional efforts like this will be increasingly vital to its success.

While Glory got off to a rough start, it seems like the organization has found its identity as a kickboxing promotion and major combat sports brand. It is undeniably a unique presence in today’s sports entertainment market. If this event is a success and the Glory audience continues to grow, I think that Glory could become a leading company. Until then, you will have to join me in keeping fingers tightly crossed.

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Overeem Destroys in 19 Seconds

  • Published in K-1

You knew it was a hard road for Todd Duffee.  Facing the rampaging Alistair Overeem, on short notice, under MMA rules where The Reem can use his killer knee?  That's a tall order, and unfortunately for the ex- UFC fighter, he wasn't up to it.

In just 19 seconds, Overeem landed a series of blows, including that murderous knee, to knock Duffee down and out.  Duffee's chin has been a question mark since his UFC loss to Mike Russow, but those blows would have put almost anyone away.  Such is the power of the K-1 champion.

With that win, Overeem claims the Interim Dream Heavyweight title, making him the current Dream, Strikeforce, and K-1 champion.  I know he has his detractors, but that's an impressive accomplishment.

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SuperKombat World Grand Prix Final in Monza Card for Nov. 22nd

  • Published in Kickboxing

On November 22nd in Monza, Italy SuperKombat will present the finals of the SuperKombat Light Heavyweight GP, the winner walking away as the champion of this season of SuperKombat and bragging rights. Aristote Quitusisa, Dawid Kasperski, Michael Terril and Jorge Loren compete for the honors.

There are also some superfights on the show, including names familiar to SK fans like Andrei Stoica, Bogdan Stoica, Catalin Morosanu and Errol Koning. There is also a Middleweight title fight between Cedric Manhoef and Julian Imeri.

Main Card:

1. Semifinal 1 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)

Aristote Quitusisa (France) vs. Dawid Kasperski (Poland)

2. Semifinal 2 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)

Michael Terrill (United Kingdom) vs. Jorge Loren (Spain)

3. Reserve Fight – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)

Alexandru Negrea (Italy) vs. Bogdan Stoica (Romania)

4. Super Fight – Middleweight Bout (-71 kg)

Riccardo Lecca (Italy) vs. Amansio Paraschiv (Romania)

5. Super Fight – Light Heavyweight Bout (-81 kg)

Errol Koning (Suriname) vs. Giuseppe De Domenico (Italy)

6. Title Fight – Middleweight Bout (-71 kg)

Julian Imeri (Italy) vs. Cedric Manhoef (Suriname)

7. Super Fight – Super Cruiserweight Bout (-95 kg)

Emilio Vallecillo (United States) vs. Andrei Stoica (Romania)

8. Super Fight – Heavyweight Bout (+96 kg)

Ron Sparks (United States) vs. Catalin Morosanu (Romania)

9. Final – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)

Winner of Semifinal 1 vs. Winner of Semifinal 2

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Kick Back and Watch Sagetdao vs. Pakon From Lumpini

  • Published in Video

There was a big event that went down at Lumpini Stadium today in Thailand, featuring a double header, the first being Penek Sitnumnoi vs Superbank Mor Ratanabandit (highlights here) and the second being Sagetdao Petpayathai vs Pakon Sakyothin. Thanks to Live Muay Thai Guy on YouTube, we have footage of Sagetdao vs. Pakon, which you should probably check out before you do anything else with your day.

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Saki on Badr Hari: "Sometimes He Makes a Mistake Because he Fights Too Aggressive."

The showdown between Badr Hari and Gokhan Saki is just two days away now, with things reaching a critical mass for both fighters. At this point both men are done training and are simply wading through the final preparations before the big fight. In an interesting interview with Fighters Only, Gokhan Saki interrupted his training earlier in the week to discuss the upcoming bout with Badr Hari as well as a bunch of other issues. One of the big topics was K-1, and he says that he knows "many things" about K-1, but that he can't talk about them right now. This goes along with a lot of the rumblings we've been hearing behind the scenes.

When asked about MMA and if he is interested, his answer is simply, "Yes, of course, I'm a fighter, you know?" Saki mentioned maybe MMA, maybe Boxing, that he has been training in both, but that his "thing is K-1" and that is his main focus for right now. [source]

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Danyo Ilunga Replaces Artem Vakhitov at GLORY 18

  • Published in Glory

It's time to focus on something a bit more productive, don't you think? What could be more productive than GLORY 18's Light Heavyweight Contender tournament set to take place on November 7th in Oklahoma City? With less than a month to go there has been a major change to the event with Artem Vakhitov suffering a minor injury. While Vakhitov will be fine to compete in a few weeks this injury has made it difficult for him to prepare for the fight in November, with him having to pull out.

His replacement is none other than former It's Showtime 95kg Champion Danyo Ilunga of Germany. Ilunga was a finalist in the GLORY 9 Light Heavyweight tournament where he fought Tyrone Spong in a fight that saw Spong victorious. Since then Ilunga has had two first round stoppages within the GLORY ring and most than deserves this spot in the tournament. 

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2010 Fight of the Year: Part 8

  • Published in Video

The last K-1 fight on the list, and we may have saved the best for last...

Peter Aerts v. Semmy Schilt (K-1 World Grand Prix Finals, December 11)

There's been a lot of ink spent on this fight already, but it's the kind of fight that deserves all that attention and more.  This was, in my opinion, the single greatest combat sports story of 2010, and the kind of story that makes you a sports fan.  On one side - the 40 year old Peter Aerts.  Aerts is the most beloved veteran of the sport, but after an unprecedented 17 year run at the top, he finally faltered last year, missing his first ever Grand Prix.  Earlier in 2010, Aerts had talked about the end coming soon, and after his KO loss to Kyotaro, it felt like the writing was on the wall - this could be the end of the road for the great one.  On the other side - the near 7 foot tall Semmy Schilt, the defending and 4 time K-1 Grand Prix champion.  Schilt is as dominant a fighter as K-1 has ever seen, never once being knocked out of the Grand Prix, or any other tournament for that matter.  All signs pointed to Schilt taking down the aged Aerts.

Now that is a moment.

Before moving on, let's take a look at exactly how Aerts pulled this off.  So many men had failed to take Schilt down - how did Aerts succeed?  One key to his victory is Aerts's ability to mix up his attack and constantly keep Schilt guessing.  He knows when to wade in with punches, when to lock Schilt up because he is too far inside, and when to retreat from the big man's strikes.  He reads Schilt masterfully, allowing him to always keep the pressure up and never let Schilt find his own rhythm.  And with that pressure he is able to connect punch after punch accurately on Schilt's chin.  They're not powerful KO shots, but they keep stunning Schilt.  Most importantly, they prevent Schilt from establishing the methodical rhythm he has used to defeat so many opponents.  It's a masterful plan, but one that takes intense concentration, confidence, and stamina to execute.  And that's where Aerts seals the deal - he never lets up, ultimately winning the fight in the final minutes.  When Schilt finally wilts under the Aerts attack, the 40 year old is still there to put the pressure on, claiming his victory with a definitive closing to the fight.  Beautiful, beautiful work that, when combined with the story going in, makes for a truly exceptional fight.

Previously featured:

Tyrone Spong v. Jerome Le Banner

Bovy Sor. Udomson v. Takaaki Umeno

Yuya Yamamoto v. Scott Shaffer

Tetsuya Yamato v. Yuta Kubo

Peter Aerts v. Ewerton Teixeira

Mike Zambidis v. Chahid Oulad El Hadj

Gokhan Saki v. Daniel Ghita

There will be 10 fights total posted, with the final two posted on Wednesday.  Fights are featured in chronological order moving through the year.  Voting will be open Thursday to determine the winner.

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