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Michael Schiavello Remembers Andy Hug

Andy HugIf you follow kickboxing you should know the name Andy Hug by now. If you aren't overly familiar with him or his body of work, you'll at least know the name from being tossed around by fans. There is a reason why the name Andy Hug lives on over ten years after his death; he was an incredible fighter who made a deep impression on every fan who has ever seen him fight.

HDnet's Michael Schiavello takes a look at Andy Hug's life and death in another great article on the HDnet website.

His third kickboxing fight was against Croatian legend Branko Cikatic at a time when Cikatic was at the height of his powers as K-1 world champion. In the end there was blood all over the canvas: Hug’s nose was broken and Cikatic’s face a bloodied mess. Hug’s hand was raised in victory and a new era in the sport was born.

Hug’s lack of boxing skills (full contact Karate competition does not permit punches to the head, so Karate exponents traditionally lack competent boxing skills) and ring savvy saw him dropped three times in the opening twenty seconds of his K-1 elimination fight against USA’s Patrick Smith in early 1994. Though Hug was never in serious trouble and jumped to his feet after each down, the referee stopped the fight on the three knockdown rule.

Hug swore revenge.

He enlisted the services of boxing trainer Uwe Ulman and on September 18 1994 claimed his revenge with a savage knee knockout to Smith’s head that stopped the American midway through the opening round.

Do yourself a favor if you don't know Andy Hug, read the rest of Schiavello's article, and go to YouTube and type in "Andy Hug." [source]

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Ernesto Hoost Wants to Sell You Reeboks

If you were ever curious as to what a retired Dutch kickboxer does after he retires other than train the next crop of champions, look no further than what goes on in Japan. In Japan, being famous means a lot more than it does in other places, as long as you have the attention of the people, you are worth piles of money. Ask Bob Sapp about that.

Ernesto Hoost is known as "Mr. Perfect" and holds four K-1 World Grand Prix Championships, which is something the Japanese fans are not going to forget any time soon. Even though Hoost hasn't participated in K-1 for a few years now, he is still popular with the Japanese people, so enter this latest ad featuring Mr. Perfect. It is for Reebok's ZIGCAMP campaign and, well, the video speaks for itself.

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Weekly Poll Results

Results from last week's poll:"Would you be interested in a K-1 women's division?"

36% - Yes, absolutely!

29% - Yes, if they get RENA

22% - No, not interested

11% - Not yet, there aren't enough fighters

2% - Not sure

This week: K-1 veteran Pat Barry was in action this weekend, defeating Joey Beltran at the UFC Fight for the Troops event.  Opinions on Barry are split, with some reports saying he used great striking to take the win, and others saying he lacked something in the victory.  What was your take?

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How the Ghost of PRIDE Haunts K-1 and DREAM

Kazuyoshi IshiiWe are all-but-done writing about FEG's financial woes. At this point what needs to be said has been said, and there is a lot of information on this topic that will never be released to the public. Until FEG makes their move, it is a dead horse that I'm sick of beating. So I've seen some articles and questions floating around that pertain to the future of DREAM and K-1, which of course revolves around television and ownership.

What many people tend to forget is way back to the death of PRIDE, the one-off event known as "Yarennoka" and the formation of DREAM. DREAM is not simple a FEG production. There is a company called "Real Entertainment" that was formed by what was left of DSE, and all of those great video packages on those DREAM events, Lenne Hardt screaming out fighters' names and even lots of the fighters themselves participating in DREAM? Thank Real Entertainment. DREAM is a co-production between RE and FEG, which is why you'll never see DREAM on Fuji TV.

So now, to fully understand how this impacts FEG, I'll hand this over to Mike Hackler of MMA-Japan.com, who did some digging and found out exactly what Real Entertainment's services mean to FEG.

FEG is in debt to Real Entertainment around $7 million USD.  Real Entertainment's involvement is a large reason why there are problems getting a TV deal done, due to the fact they still have management from DSE.  FUJI has no interest in a television deal, solely for this reason.  Real Entertainment is also responsible for paying the fighters (as to what extent, I do not know).  Many fighters contracts are with Real Entertainment and not FEG.

FEG is stuck.  Ishii owns the rights and the brand names with FEG.  This makes reorganizing the company extremely difficult, if not impossible. That said, it has been confirmed that PUJI has backed out of this altogether.  As any private equity does, FEG is reluctant to allow for managerial changes to take place.  This creates a brick wall for outside investors to get involved.

This beautifully articulates how FEG is stuck in a tough position, and some of the power struggles that are going on during this downtime for K-1 and DREAM. Many people I've spoken to have talked about (off the record, as always) Tanikawa wanting to form a new company and leave Ishii out of the business entirely, but as long as Ishii owns the name "K-1" it will be impossible to break away from his influence. [source]

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