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GLORY 30 and GLORY SuperFight Series Live Results

  • Published in Americas

GLORY 30 Los Angeles goes down tonight, with the SuperFight Series beginning at 10pm eastern live on UFC Fight Pass. The main card is slated to begin around 12:30am eastern time live on ESPN3. For those that can't make it, GLORY 30 will be re-airing on ESPN2 on Sunday night at 9pm eastern time. 

The main card sees a GLORY Middleweight Championship bout between challenger Dustin Jacoby and champion Simon Marcus, hoping to make his first successful defense after the controversial win over former champion Artem Levin. The co-main event sees Marat Grigorian take on Djime Coulibaly in a lightweight showdown and the rest of the main card is a welterweight tournament.

The SuperFight Series is worth the price of admission alone with the main event being Joe Schilling vs. Jason Wilnis in a rematch, as well as the debut of Tiffany van Soest against Esma Hasshass in the first round of GLORY's Super Bantamweight Grand Prix. Also featured is a big heavyweight showdown between Brian Douwes and Guto Inocente.

GLORY 30 Los Angeles

Middleweight Title Headline Bout: Simon Marcus (c) def. Dustin Jacoby by Unanimous Dec (Jacoby put up a good fight, and had some great moments but he got an 8 count in the first round (overhand right) and the 5th (right kick body kick). He was too busy trying to land 1 KO punch.

Lightweight Co-Headline Bout: Marat Grigorian def. Djimé by KO Rd 1 (perfectly timed right high kick just as Djime moved his face into it)

Welterweight Tournament Final Bout: Richard Abraham def. Francois Ambang by Split Dec (Great back and forth fight, it could have gone either way, I thought Ambang did more damage but Abraham was busier)

Welterweight Tournament Semi-Final Bout B: Francois Ambang def. Daniel Morales by Unanimous Dec (Ambang just landing the better shots all 3 rounds)

Welterweight Tournament Semi-Final Bout A: Richard Abraham def. Casey Greene by Unanimous Dec (Abraham landing overhand rights at will eventually gets a knockdown in the 2nd and wins the fight by decision)

GLORY 30 SuperFight Series

Middleweight Headline Bout: Jason Wilnis def. Joe Schilling by Majority Dec (close fight up until Wilnis landed an overhand and left hook in the 3rd and scored a knockdown)

Heavyweight Co-Headline Bout: Guto Inocente def. Brian Douwes by Unanimous Dec (Entertaining fight with Inocente throwing non stop spinning attacks and Douwes just not mounting enough offence to win)

Super Bantamweight Bout: Tiffany van Soest def. Esma Hasshass by Unanimous Dec (Tiffany scored a perfectly timed right hand to get a 10-8 first round and was just a bit too experienced for Hasshass)

Middleweight Bout: Mike Lemaire def. Karl Roberson by Unanimous Dec (Lemaire scored a knockdown in round 1 and Roberson couldn't get into the fight after that point)

Light-Heavyweight Bout: Manny Mancha def. Warren Thompson by Unanimous Dec

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For Joe Schilling Last Man Standing is About His Legacy

  • Published in Interviews

This weekend at GLORY Last Man Standing Joe Schilling has a date with a second GLORY tournament. The first one was a victory for Schilling at GLORY 10, putting him atop of the heap of GLORY’s stacked Middleweight division. At least for that night. We can easily say that GLORY 10 was a great night for Schilling, but GLORY 12 was not a great night for Schilling, although he’ll be the first one to tell you that it wasn’t his best night.

Heading into GLORY’s Last Man Standing tournament Joe is faced with three past opponents in Wayne Barrett, Artem Levin and Simon Marcus, each of which are involved in the tournament in different parts of the bracket, with there being a chance of him meeting each one on Saturday if things turn out that way. Revenge doesn’t seem to be on the mind of Schilling this time, though, nor does calling out a round for a knockout. Instead, he seems refocused.

At Last Man Standing Joe Schilling’s night starts off with not only a rematch, but a third meeting with an old adversary in Simon Marcus, but that is the furthest thing from his mind right now; “You know, everyone is asking me about rematches, they are all really excited about that. I guess there is more of an emotional connection to the previous fights than even I do. Rematch with Simon, rematch with Barrett, rematch with Levin, and I’m not thinking about that at all. It doesn’t even cross my mind, I’m a different fighter and I don’t expect them to be the same fighter. I’m really just focused on winning the tournament.

“Gotta go through Simon Marcus first, then I gotta go through Barrett, but if it’s Barrett I’ll beat Barrett, if it’s Stoica then I’ll be Stoica. Who even knows who comes through that other bracket. It’s crazy. I’m really focused I’m being the best Joe Schilling that I can be that night. I’ve made some changes in my game, in my lifestyle and the mental side of it. I feel like I’ll really be able to express what I’m capable of on the 21st. I’m really excited to show everybody what I’m capable of, but also show myself what I’m capable of. The rematches, though? They really mean nothing to me. At the end of the night, when I’m holding my belt, I’ll probably be laughing like, ‘Oh I knocked out Simon,’ but it’s not what I’m focused on right now.”

GLORY 12 was a tough night for Joe, but it wasn’t the first time that he’s had to face a loss in his career. “Yeah, when I lose a fight I really get very internal; why I lost the fight, what I was thinking, what I was doing. There are a lot of mistakes that I’ve been making for a long time in my career, stylistically, and we’ve really been focused on changing those things. The sparring has worked out really well and I’m really excited about it. After the Eddie Walker knockout I came back stronger, after I lost to Simon the second time I had to go to Thailand to fight Karapet on short notice, so I really look at my losses as big chunks of experience.

“I mean, look at the records of some of these other guys in the tournament. Sure, I have a much bigger record than Wayne Barrett, but for the most part I have less than everybody else in the tournament. Any and all experience that I can get I gotta take advantage of, but these losses are big for me, they are learning experiences. I’m humbled by my losses and it forces me to take a good look at me and it’s a good thing for my career.”

This brought about the topic of pressure and what kind of pressure that Joe feels going into this tournament. If you remember going into GLORY 10 Joe felt that he had to win the tournament to make a statement about Americans in Kickboxing, but now he sees more and more fighters from America stepping up and this is more about himself and his legacy. Joe is looking for not only a win, but a legacy like that of some of Kickboxing’s legends with back-to-back tournament wins.

“I’ve always put so much pressure on myself that I don’t really see other people’s pressure. I hold myself to a very high standard. In the past I’ve said stuff like, ‘well I’m gonna knock him out in this round’ and put even more pressure on myself, but for me there’s a ton of pressure on this fight for myself. I want to prove and really cement my legacy in Kickboxing. It means the world to me that I was the first American to win a global combat sports tournament like this and it’s really important for me to do it twice in a row. I want to go down in history with like Peter Aerts and Semmy Schilt, that’s the pressure that I feel. I don’t want to be in the back shaking my head and apologizing like I was after the Barrett fight and I have 100% myself to blame for that. I took him too lightly and I just,” Joe paused for a few seconds, searching for the right words. “I screwed up. I didn’t fight my fight, that wasn’t the best Joe Schilling.

“That won’t happen again,” he added, in regards to his frustrations in the fight with Barrett. “I was in there and I was frustrated, not even with Wayne, but I was frustrated with myself. Things picked up in the third round but even then it was sloppy, it was careless, it wasn’t me. So there is a ton of pressure for me not to do that again in this fight, but I feel like with the changes we’ve made there’s no chance of that happening again. There’s a lot less pressure knowing that I’m fighting the best fighters in the world. No one has ever watched a K-1 World Grand Prix and thought, ‘well that guy sucks.’ Everybody in there belongs in there, seven of us, the best Middleweights in the world, are gonna lose on Saturday. It’s gonna be a tough night, I’m not gonna be dancing afterwards. I have the utmost respect for all of the guys in the tournament, but it’s gonna be my night. It’s in my home city in front of my family and my friends, it’s gonna be epic.”

It’s also interesting to note that Schilling does have the homefield advantage going into this tournament, something that he had for the GLORY 10 Middleweight tournament as well. It was something that he was missing at GLORY 12 when he fought Wayne Barrett in New York, though; “Yeah, you know, I walked out and was getting booed. It’s happened twice in my career and both times it’s taken me out of my game. Actually, both times it was on the East coast, maybe I need to not fight on the East coast anymore?” He joked. “But for sure, I’m a lot more comfortable when I fight at home. No one wants to lose in front of their friends.”

So for Joe Schilling at GLORY Last Man Standing there isn’t revenge on his mind, instead it’s his legacy and taking his place as one of the greats in Kickboxing by winning consecutive tournaments. It is without a doubt a tall order considering the talent involved, but Schilling seems just as excited to watch the fights at Last Man Standing and GLORY 17 as he is to compete. He’s a kickboxing fan first and a fighter second and it’s very clear that this Joe Schilling is humbled and mentally prepared for what is before him.

Will it be his night again? Tune in on Saturday night at 10pm Eastern time on PPV for GLORY Last Man Standing, immediately following GLORY 17 on Spike TV at 8pm Eastern time. For more information, head to http://www.gloryppv.com

 

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Glory Unlocks Simon Marcus Vs Joe Schilling Video

  • Published in Kickboxing

Glory Sports International has unlocked one of the most exciting and dramatic kickboxing fights ever for us to watch completely free. Joe Schilling Vs Simon Marcus had us all jumping out of our seats at Glory 17. This was their third encounter with Marcus winning the first two but those were Muay Thai rules which favors Simon. This time it was Glory rules which allows Schilling to box more without Marcus smothering him in the clinch and the outcome shows what a difference it makes.

This was such a back and forth fight with Schilling looking like he was losing, and then all of a sudden a switch of momentum and Marcus would look like hes losing and this happened repeatedly until the very last second. It's fights like this that prove the excitement and entertainment that kickboxing can bring to the fans.

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Artem Levin Talks About the Fallout From GLORY 27, the Future and More

  • Published in Interviews

On Friday, February 27th Glory returned to Chicago and headlining the event was the third installment of the epic battle between Simon Marcus and Artem Levin. Glory 27 did not disappoint from the first bout to the last, fighters electrified the crowd with stunning knockouts and hard fought battles. The main event was not without drama. The night ended with reigning champion Artem Levin being disqualified after he failed to continue fighting. In a statement he later released to the public, Levin apologized to his fans for letting them down, however, he revealed that he felt self respect was far more important than winning or losing. In a follow-up conversation with Levin, he expressed his view point and gave an idea of what is to come.

Levin: The refereeing was strange from the very beginning. There were thoughts after the fight, perhaps, I overreacted and ended the fight early, but after another time I’ve watched the fight, I realized that I was right about everything. The referee was charged-up from the start, beginning with the fictitious knockdown. They’ve taken way the belt for the second time using this referee. The 4-man tournament in Los Angeles in 2013 involved the referee beginning the count after a punch to shoulder in the extra round. Also during this event the referee began the count in the first round and took points from me in the next rounds due to mutual clinching. This referee has done the same thing each time refereeing my fights. I decided in the third round to exit and to stop the absurdness and nonsense. Some say, that I should have continued and fight until the final bell, but the referee would have taken a point another time and I’d be disqualified by him. So I thought I should make a decision. I rely on me only, I decide my fate myself, thus I made the decision! Numerous Americans, Canadians, and websites around the world supported me. I am sure that I’ve done the right thing!

As far as his immediate plans, Levin continued: I’ve got many suggestions, but I’ve signed with GLORY at the current time. The future is interesting, time will show whether I will be perfoming. I’d like to leave it without comment. I will say that one of my main aim is to perform in Russia I've been fighting abroad through all my career in foreign promotions, with foreign supporters, with foreign referees. Now I’d like to fight for my native fans in my country with the best opponents!

As I footnote to Levin's comments, I asked Glory CEO, Jon Franklin to give some of his feedback on the incident.

Jon Franklin: ISKA held a special session during the rules meeting to triple check that the athletes understood clinching and holding rules. The rules are available to the athletes and it is the responsibility of the athletes to know and understand all rules of competition. If an athlete has a question about the referee or judging, there is a proper procedure in place for review after the bouts. One of the rules is that refusing to fight will result in a disqualification. That is what happened.

It remains to be seen whether Levin will in some way attempt to appeal the disqualification on some ground or if he will just prepare himself for Levin-Marcus IV.

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Simon Marcus is Ready for GLORY 21 and the Responsibilities of Being a Champion

  • Published in Interviews

"You're always training to fight someone who is training to fight you..."  That is a fighter's life according to Simon Marcus, and that's a very accurate portrait when you think of it. Simon Marcus, is not an enigma, he's not one for shadow games or deception.  Who he is however, is a man of ordinary means and on Friday, May 8th, a man with an incredible opportunity, the chance to become the middle weight champion of GLORY, the world's premier kickboxing association.  Ahead of this event, I had to opportunity to speak with Simon about what we can expect on Friday night as well as a peek into the life of the "Bad Bwoy".

For people who are unaware, Levin and Marcus have faced each other before.  During that bout that was conducted under Muay Thai rules, Marcus was the victor.  While he admits that a previous win over an opponent may inspire some level of confidence knowing that you have previously beat that person.  Today,  Marcus chooses to focus on the task at hand and what it will take to be victorious again. Marcus has also made the choice not to focus on the what ifs, especially 'what if he loses'.  He stated that in his life, he continues to strive and even in those instances when a fight does go his way he has a desire to continue to improve and get better as a person. Of the things that has striven to improve in the ring, Simon stated that he has upped his cardio which he demonstrated during open work outs at The Boxing Gym on Wednesday as well as during his hard fought victory during the middleweight tournament last month in Dubai.   Marcus also stated that he has challenged himself in improving his conditioning, strength and overall pushed himself to his limits in preparation for GLORY 21. He states that even on the winning side he is never satisfied with his performance and is always looking for ways he can improve. While he is highly critical of himself, Marcus also expressed that he is attempting to learn how to enjoy those successes.

Coming into the world of a disciplined fighter at age 18, as in the case of many other fighters, provided an outlet and an opportunity for him to turn a negative into a positive.  Instead of getting into trouble for fighting, it has now become his passion and something for which he now receives praise.  As for his personal road to GLORY, Marcus stated that he trained as hard as he could, fought as much as he could and believed in himself.  In addition to that Marcus stated that he travelled and made a lot of sacrifices.  He also stated that many times he fought for free and did everything he could to get experience, good training and anything he could to get better, not necessarily looking at the immediate pay out but his long term goal of getting to the top.

What does he bring to the ring?  Simon Marcus brings a warrior spirit and an intellectual mentality, not to mention a lot of power and heart.  Additionally Simon Marcus brings excitement and a willingness to pull out all the stops to get the win.

As for the future, Marcus plans to completely focus on GLORY and winning/defending the title.  His vision does not stop there.  Simon Marcus would like to be a person who will take GLORY to another level and having people interested and seeing what the best striking in the world is about. 

To anyone who might be interested in embarking on a journey such as this, Simon Marcus stated that he would not discourage anyone from pursing a fighter's life, but he quickly differentiated between having a calling vs. having an interest. He stated if a person is just interested in being a fighter for the accolades or whatever comes along with it, that might not be the way to go.  He added that if someone has a love for fighting or a person has fighting in them, and they feel that fighting brings out the best in them or develops them, then that would be a more satisfying path to take.  Fighting as a career and as a lifestyle is difficult emotionally and physically.

After retirement, which Marcus stated at this point he doesn't know when that will occur, his love of fighting, teaching and martial arts directs his future to remain on its current path, in the realm of combat sports entertaining options of possibly promoting or opening a gym and in that way continuing to pass the tradition on.  If we hadn't met Simon Marcus as the Muay Thai/kickboxing practitioner that we see today, Marcus stated that it's very difficult to guess where he'd be today as he was always fighting and getting in trouble doing it.  He admits that when he was younger he had an interest in basketball and was a good player in high school but didn't have the focus on school to continue on this path. From where he sits now Marcus appears to be happy, he is an accomplished fighter, a father and fighting in an organization that he feels is right on the cusp of becoming something huge!

Beyond Friday night, Marcus has no one in particular on his radar, stating that he believes his greatest fight is with himself because he has the belief that in anything you do, there is a constant inner battle to become the best version of you.

So while on Friday night at GLORY 21 we won't get to see Simon Marcus vs. Simon Marcus, we will witness a continuation of this young man's journey to champion status in a battle between two of the best middleweights in the world.  On Friday night, Simon acknowledges that he has tremendous opportunity and when it's one man's time, it's his time and critics can say what they like, but Friday is his time.  He feels he has done the things necessary to have earned this opportunity.  To his fans, Simon Marcus sends out a sincere and heartfelt thanks.  To those who have supported him and all the friends and family who have traveled to San Diego he expresses sincere gratitude.

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Artem Levin Talks Marcus Rematch, Vaseline and What Went Down Leading Into GLORY 25

  • Published in Interviews

To many he's an enigma, quiet, stealthy and calculating. A man of few words outside the ring where afterall, he's let his knees, fists and elbows do most of his talking.  On the other side of the ropes Levin is relaxed with the disarming smile of a school boy and someone who would seem incapable of the brutality he often inflicts upon his opponents. With the precision of some of his idols, Artem Levin has taken the world of kickboxing and muay thai by storm and is preparing to indelibly leave his mark on the sport. Currently Levin is top man in the Middleweight division, a title he earned in 2014 and one which he is determined to maintain for years to come. On Friday, February 27th Levin will again defend his title as he for the third time faces Simon Marcus. In what is bound to be one of the most exciting face-offs of the year, Levin and Marcus will participate in an extremely emotional battle which most recently erupted at Glory 21 in San Diego. Ahead of this trilogy, I had an opportunity to pose some questions to Levin and find out what beats within the heart of "The Lion".

On his beginnings:

I was born in a small provincial town of Prokopyevsk. It’s a mine town. There were no other good professions other than coalminer in the 1990s. There were three ways to make living: be a coalminer, a criminal or a sportsman, so I joined my brothers at the gym. They were going in for boxing and then muay thai became my sport. My influence was the fact that there had been some muay thai fighters with world and European titles and golden medals at that time in town, and not any boxing champions.

What was your family's response to you pursuing kickboxing as a profession?

Definitely my parents and my family are my main fans, my support, my base of power. They support me and make me comfortable. My mother is distressed for me as any mother would be. She always waits for the ending of this “nightmare”, but at the same time she understands my choice and that it’s useless to dispute with me. I’m really proud of my family. They had waited for me to quit during the first years of my sports experience, but everyone knows that it’s my life choice now.

Had you not pursued a career in combat sports what other kind of career would you have chosen?

It’s hard for me to say. I’ve been in sports since I remember myself, I began with muay thai when I was 10. I always have seen myself with a career in sports. I see myself as comprehensive person: I read books and I have many hobbies. All that happens through sports. I guess, nothing good can come without sport, but I haven’t known another life.

Describe a typical training day when you are preparing for a fight.

It’s not exciting. My usual routine: wake up, have a breakfast, go to morning workout for an approximately 1.5-2 hour session of drills and techniques, speed or strength endurance exercises.  It depends on preparation stage but then lunch, sleep and on to a second workout which usually includes an intensive 3 hour session of sparring and using special equipment.  After training I usually take a walk, have dinner, do some reading before bed and then sleep and it all begins again.

You are becoming widely known for your boxing and defensive strategy, what do you feel are some of your other strengths as a fighter?

I don’t focus narrowly on one thing. Perhaps, I act instinctively in a fight and I’m training in all aspects. I try to become comprehensive. My work is based on defense firstly. I appreciate my health, that’s why I don’t want to join in an exchange of blows or to let a punch get through. It's my goal to keep being healthy during my entire career  so as to take more fights with sober mind, without injures, with fresh body.

Who inspires you as a fighter?

I’m inspired by legendary athletes, even though not martial artists, such as Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali – they became iconic for thousands around the world. I admire Michael Jordan, Usain Bolte, Michael Phelps and others who became a hero in their sport. Those who proved that nothing is impossible.

Aside from fighting Joe Schilling and possibly Simon Marcus again, are there any other fighters with whom you'd be interested in being matched up against.

It doesn’t matter who’s the opponent. If you want to be the best, to leave a mark in kickboxing or muay thai history, it doesn’t matter who you fight against. You don’t choose opponents, you just defeat the best and prove that you are the best. The question: who I’d be interested in fighting against? I don’t have any preference. I want to fight no matter against who.

How many years have you've been living in San Diego? How did you choose that city? Has the transition between the two countries been difficult?

Well I can’t say I’ve moved here yet. I still live in Russia. One of my training camps is here and there are valuable opportunities here to develop and work on my career. The transition was quite easy, my friends from The Boxing Club in San Diego have helped. I chose San Diego as it is a warm city by the ocean with a mild climate and beautiful places to live in. It’s a simple choice after cold Siberia.  

Your fight with Simon Marcus in San Diego was a bit controversial. Both of you felt that you had won the match. Additionally during the post-fight press conference, you expressed a concern that he had not been called on excessive holding. Can you talk more about that fight from your perspective in terms of the calls by the referee and how the match was scored. How do you feel it should have been scored.

Definitely I won the fight. As for Simon Marcus, he played foul. He was slippery with vaseline. I guess it was a trick to rub on the vaseline a few hours before the fight, for skin to dry and then to become slippery with sweat. We are not allowed to apply anything besides vaseline to our face. As for points, I wonder why a point was reduced from my score and none from Simon’s, the clinch was mutual. Thus I think I won three rounds undoubtedly at least. If I gave away two rounds to him, I still don’t think that I lost them.  A draw is a gift to him from the judges and referees. From the referee especially, I’d say. He can thank the referee personally.

Also you have been highly criticized by Joe Schilling. Most recently following the Glory 25 event Schilling stated that he feels that you are in fact avoiding him. You were set to face Schilling for the third time in Denver this year but had to withdraw due to injury. Can you talk about what happened and where you are with your recovery?

I was injured during training camp before the amateur world championships in Thailand in August. The injury was not severe but it was such that it could keep me from proper preparation for the fight.  I was informed about the fight six weeks before it was scheduled and it was to be held in a high mountain region. I am the champion of the promotion. It would be foolish to go on with that risk and to demonstrate disrespect in that way to Schilling. If I took a fight as insignificant and began preparation within 6 weeks, and taking into account that I had  been to Thailand at that time, then - 5 weeks, and I could take normal proper workout sessions in a week after then perhaps. That’s why I did not and I also saw the prospect of coming to a fight with an injury and without proper preparation as disrespectful to GLORY’s executives. I won a WKN title bout recently and I am recovered and  motivated.  I’m ready to fight anywhere. I’d rather watch Joe Schilling fight outside  the USA. Is he able to fight outside California or USA? He needs helpful judges.

I know that continuing to defend your title is a priority for you in the coming year. Do you have any other plans for 2016?

The main priority is my title defense obviously, but also to fight more, in any promotion, even if it would be not GLORY.  I took the WKN muay thai belt and now my aim is leave a mark in muaythai and kickboxing, for people to remember me even after the my career is finished.

Any message to your fans?

Enjoy spectacular fights. Thank you for your support. Follow me on Instagram and watch my career. I will try my best to reward you with my victories.

Reminiscent of the Thrilla in Manila, Glory 27 is expected to bring the drama from which only one man can walk away victorious.  Levin has the confidence and the experience -- Marcus, the determination and the desire to bring to fruition a lifetime of dedication.  Friday night at the Sears Centre it will be time.  

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Glory 17: Last Man Standing Open Workouts and Press Conference Highlights

  • Published in Glory

With only one more sleep remaining until the biggest kickboxing card since the K-1 WGP days, I find myself looking for every hype video I can possibly find to kill time until Glory 17.

This video shows us some short clips of some of the fighters doing an open workout and the best parts of the press conference. Seeing the different ways and contrast between the way fighters train is always interesting to watch (especially for me considering sometimes i can use some of their tricks). For example watching Simon Marcus, a more Thai style fighter hit pads is very different from watching Jarrell Miller, more of a boxer, or even Rico Verhoeven who is a Dutch kickboxer. Each fighter's skills are looking world class and they are looking in top condition.

Now on to the press conference, I'd just like to say how happy I am to finally see Daniel Ghita come out of his shell and and say more than two words. Its great to see how bitter he is about his last fight with Rico and we will see tomorrow how hard he has trained to show us that he believes he is the real champion. Its also nice to see no matter how confident they are everyone is still respectful and realizes how dangerous every other fighter is.

As if I wasn't excited enough, this video really pumped me up. I have really missed 8 man kickboxing tournaments and I feel that most of the new American kickboxing fans are going to watch this and realize what a real fight card is.

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Check Out the GLORY 21 Countdown Featuring Levin and Marcus

  • Published in Glory

Bill Goldberg wasn't kidding when he said that he loves GLORY kickboxing. He's back again hosting a GLORY countdown show and this time he's helping the world get hyped up for the rematch between Simon Marcus and Artem Levin. Levin will be defending the GLORY Middleweight Championship against one of his main career-nemeses in Marcus but this time it's under GLORY rules and not Muay Thai.

GLORY 21 is on May 8th on Spike TV. 

Levin

Marcus

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Artem Levin vs. Simon Marcus; or, the One Win That Eludes Levin

  • Published in Glory

When we talk about what GLORY calls their Middleweight division right now it’s hard not to recognize three names as the standard bearer for that division; Artem Levin, Simon Marcus and Joe Schilling. Artem Levin has been the man to beat for many years within the division, although he has been beaten. In fact, he’s only been beaten by Simon Marcus and Joe Schilling since his incredible run on top began back in 2011. Yet somehow Artem Levin always ends up back on top of the division, as the king.

That’s just what he brings to the table. 

Simon Marcus and Artem Levin are at an interesting point in their feud right now, where Simon Marcus holds a win over Levin from Lion Fight in 2013, but their last meeting at GLORY 21 ended in a controversial draw. I say controversial because many saw it as a cut-and-dry win for Simon Marcus, although the judges saw it as a draw. Perhaps if contested under muay thai rules the score cards would have leaned towards Simon and his aggressive, clinch-heavy style. Instead, fans were left wanting more after the five round war and had to wait over half a year for the resolution to that battle. 

Originally they were scheduled to meet at GLORY 24 in Denver, but an ankle injury forced Simon Marcus out of the fight, who was then replaced by Joe Schilling. Almost immediately after Schilling vs. Levin III was announced Levin pulled out of the fight with an elbow injury, which for Schilling brought back flashbacks to trying to get his first meeting with Levin arranged in the first place back in 2012 and 2013, with them scheduled to fight at Battle for the Belts only for Levin to pull out and Kaoklai to replace him. Schilling faced Jason Wilnis at GLORY 24 instead, with Schilling looking aggressive and hungry, Wilnis losing via TKO thanks to an injury and leaving Schilling as a contender for the belt, but Marcus/Levin as the fight that has to happen first. 

Crazily enough, on the undercard this weekend Joe Schilling will be fighting again, this time against American muay thai standout Mike Lemaire. If Schilling, who has one fight left under his GLORY contract after this one and has made it clear that he’ll be participating in Bellator’s Kickboxing league once that is up, gets his title shot is another question entirely. 

With Schilling waiting in the wings that leaves Artem Levin to do his best to pick up a win over a career adversary, the only one that he hasn’t been able to defeat and has hounded him for years. Their styles mesh together perfectly in a messy muay thai-mish-mash of clinching, slipped strikes, knees and punches. While both men are perhaps better suited for muay thai rules, Levin has adjusted the best to the rules while Marcus has had a few stumbling points, including losses to Fang Bian and Joe Schilling that have seen him down and out on the mat. Levin undoubtedly possesses power, but rarely does Levin finish opponents compared to out-techniquing them like he’s prone to doing and picking up a decision. 

As we saw in their last meeting, though, to decisively find himself the winner he’s going to have to do more than be slippery and to initiate and smother in the clinch. Judges and fans want to see more from both men and expect the very best of the best when they clash. Undoubtedly their last bout showed off their skill, but in the judges’ eyes they effectively canceled each other out. This is a big deal for both men, but for Levin this is the one, elusive win that he’s not been able to rack up in his decorated career. 

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A Breakdown of GLORY 21

  • Published in Glory

Tomorrow night on Spike TV GLORY 21 will hit the airwaves in an event headlined by two of the very best Middleweights in the world squaring off for the GLORY Middleweight Championship. Artem Levin will defend his GLORY Middleweight Championship against the challenger Simon Marcus in a rematch of a bout from two years ago that saw Marcus get the best of Artem Levin under the Lion Fight banner.

On top of that will be some Raymond Daniels violence and a Heavyweight qualifying tournament featuring some fresh, new names. Let's break things down.

Artem Levin vs. Simon Marcus

This is a fight that we've seen before and it's between two of the best in the division. The only name that is missing from the equation is Joe Schilling who has proven to be a foil to both men at different points. What's funny is that some combination of those three have held claims to being the best in the division in both muay thai and kickboxing for some years now. 

While Marcus was able to get a win over Levin in muay thai rules in their first meeting it's not an assurance that the same will happen here at GLORY 21. Levin is incredibly slick and well-adjusted to kickboxing rules. His strengths rely on his hands, footwork and ability to slip and counter-strike. For Marcus his strengths are generally within the realm of muay thai; elbows and of course his clinch. Those are tools that he won't have at his disposal in the GLORY ring. He's had success of late in the GLORY ring, but not against anyone the caliber of Levin.

I see Levin having the tools to defeat Marcus and probably via decision, but it wouldn't shock me if Marcus took a decision here either.

Raymond Daniels vs. Justin Baesman

The matchmaking here is rather transparent to me; this fight is to feature Raymond Daniels on television and hoping that he does something really cool. No offense to Baesman, but making his kickboxing debut against Daniels is not the best way to go.

Heavyweight Tournament

There have been some shakeups in this tournament of late, so now we are looking at Xavier Vigney vs. Maurice Jackson and Demoreo Dennis vs. Chi Lewis Parry. 

Xavier Vigney is an interesting case of a fight who made his professional debut in the K-1 World Grand Prix in 2012 against Seth Petruzelli. That takes guts and dismantling a veteran like Petruzelli with ease like he did took skill. His second fight was against Zabit Samedov and didn't quite go as well, but he still showed promise. He's pumped the brakes a bit since then and this is him moving to that next level. There isn't a lot to say about Maurice Jackson than to ask where his record of 31-0 came from. It's fair to say that Vigney should win this, but Jackson is a big guy.

Originally slated to be Chi Lewis Parry vs. Everett Sims we now have Demoreo Dennis filling in. Dennis, you might remember, went the limit with Pat Barry earlier this year and most smart fans had their scorecards in favor of Dennis and not Barry in contrast to the judges. While Dennis has some holes in his game, he's been focused on it for longer and this is a big shot for him. Chi Lewis Parry talks a big game and his record in both kickboxing and MMA is impressive on paper right now, but we've still yet to see what he can really do against real competition. Dennis is a step up in competition for him and he can prove himself a bit here. 

It appears that Lewis Parry vs. Vigney is the fight that everyone wants to see in the finals, considering they were originally supposed to meet at a recent GLORY event until Vigney fell prey to a training injury. I think that Vigney wins no matter what, but there is still so little known about Lewis Parry that it is hard to really predict.

As for the SuperFight Series, well, there have been so many changes within the last 24 hours to that card that it feels unfair to come to any conclusions without research. There is, of course, not enough time to really research most of these fighters at this time, so just try to enjoy the fights.

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