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Michael Schiavello Discusses the Ten Best Kicks

  • Published in K-1

Our good friend and combat sports veteran announcer Michael Schiavello also happens to be one of the better combat sports writers out there when he wants to be, which should make a lot of people take notice. Schiavello does this in his free time, in between jetsetting all over the world and calling nearly every awesome combat sports show not under the Zuffa banner in the world. What I am saying is, take note, MMA writers.

Schiavello take a look at ten of the best kicks outside of MMA, which he rightfully so, has labeled the "Showtime Kick" by Anthony Pettis at WEC's finale event as the best MMA kick. He runs the gambit, from Muay Thai strikers like Enriko Kehl and Saenchai to kickboxing legends like Andy Hug and Remy Bonjasky, Schiavello covers it all.

One of my favorites that he covers is Andy Hug's Tornado kick to the leg of Mike Bernardo in 1996.

What makes Hug’s variation so special is that he threw the kick to Bernardo’s thigh, rather than delivering, as is usual, to the opponent’s midsection. No sooner had the kick been thrown did it become an international sensation and everyone in the world began attempting spinning back kicks to the thigh (just as we’ll no doubt see many Pettis “Showtime Kick” clones).  To this day, however, in my many years of watching and commentating combat sports, I have never seen another fighter execute a spinning back kick to the thigh for a knockout. Take into consideration that Hug performed this technique against the more highly-fancied Bernardo in the final of the biggest martial arts competition on Earth and you can appreciate the complete spectacle of this technique.

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Andy Hug, The Freebirds and the Von Erichs: What Kickboxing is Missing Right Now

  • Published in News

I want you to visualize what is one of the most iconic knockouts in the history of Kickboxing. Visualize Andy Hug landing that spinning back kick on Mike Bernardo’s knee in the K-1 World Grand Prix 1996 Finals and the gravity that came from that kick. It was a tremendous story; Andy Hug, the undersized fighter who had lost to Bernardo twice before had finally overcome the odds when everything was on the line. It was hard to not feel something from that knockout. 

The concept of sport at its best and most effective is when there is an emotional bond between the athlete and the spectator. Without a doubt there is a magical spark that happens when an athlete achieves a lifelong dream while a spectator, one that is emotionally invested in the athlete, watches on and cheers. In part it is due to living out a fantasy vicariously through the athlete; being able to see someone achieve their dream, to, if even for just a brief moment, be able to see someone reach those great heights that always seem out of reach. 

In combat sports, which are about the individual and not a team, the ultimate goal is usually to win a World Championship. It’s a story that writes itself, a story about climbing to the top of the mountain and becoming the best, then defending that title and continuing to be the best. When the fans have an emotional investment in the fighter it is just amplified and the journey is all-the-more satisfying.

It’s these things that make combat sports the most fulfilling ones to spectate in the world, but it is also what makes them so inherently frustrating to be a fan of. Conventional wisdom points towards acquiring the most talent, to toss them into the ring against each other and hope that not only a World Champion emerges, but that a star will be born as well. The problem with this is that the more names that are involved, the more individuals with their own stories, personalities, strengths and weaknesses are in play and after a while they begin to get lost in the shuffle.

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K-1 World Grand Prix Final 16 in Tokyo VTR

  • Published in K-1

K-1 makes their return to Japan on October 14th in Tokyo with the K-1 World Grand Prix Final 16. The event will also be a Memorial event for the deceased Andy Hug, who was extremely popular in Japan. Well, the first VTR for the upcoming event has been released and it looks pretty much on par with older K-1 videos.

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Bloodstain Lane Pays Tribute to Andy Hug

  • Published in K-1

If you don't know Andy Hug, immediately go over to YouTube and search for his fights, that is really all that I can say to you. Andy Hug is one of the greatest kickboxers to ever grace the K-1 ring. Hug was a bit undersized to be fighting against the Heavyweights of the world but still not only held his own, but was successful. Love him or hate him, Bloodstain Lane's latest video does a great job of paying tribute to Andy Hug, who was diagnosed with acute leukemia in 2000, fell into a coma and passed away after multiple organ failure. [source]

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Weekly Poll Results

  • Published in K-1

Last week's results: After his loss at Strikeforce: Fedor vs. Silva, what now for Ray Sefo?

55% - Focus on being a trainer, not a fighter

26% - Stop MMA and focus on kickboxing for one final run

11% - Keep doing what he's doing

8% - Stop kickboxing and focus full time on MMA

This week - a pretty straight forward question:

Who is K-1's Greatest of All Time?

Vote now!

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